The individuality of relatively permanent pigmented or vascular skin marks (RPPVSM) in independently and uniformly distributed patterns

Arfika Nurhudatiana, Adams Wai Kin Kong, Keyan Matinpour, Deborah Chon, Lisa Altieri, Siu Yeung Cho, Noah Craft

Research output: Journal PublicationArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With recent advances in multimedia technology, the involvement of digital images/videos in crimes has been increasing significantly. Identification of individuals in these images/videos can be challenging. For example, in cases of child sexual abuse, child pornography, and masked gunmen, the faces of criminals or victims are often hidden or covered and only some body parts (e.g., back, thigh, and arm) can be observed from the digital evidence. Although tattoos and scars can be used for identification in some cases, they are neither universal nor unique. We propose a group of skin marks named Relatively Permanent Pigmented or Vascular Skin Marks (RPPVSM) as a biometric trait for forensic identification. To support the scientific underpinnings of using RPPVSM patterns as a novel biometric trait, the individuality was studied. RPPVSM on the backs of 269 male subjects were examined. We found that RPPVSM in middle to low density patterns tend to form an independent and uniform distribution, while RPPVSM in high density patterns tend to form clusters. We present in this paper an individuality model for the independently and uniformly distributed RPPVSM patterns. When compared to the empirical results, this model fits the empirical distribution very well. Finally, the predicted error rates for verification and identification are reported.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6502710
Pages (from-to)998-1012
Number of pages15
JournalIEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Forensics
  • individuality
  • predicted error rates
  • probability of random correspondence
  • skin marks
  • statistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Computer Networks and Communications

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