Numerical and experimental validations of the theoretical basis for a nozzle based pulse technique for determining building airtightness

Edward Cooper, Xiaofeng Zheng, Christopher J. Wood

Research output: Journal PublicationArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Motivated by intentions of avoiding large net fluid flow and enabling a more practical airtightness test for large buildings, a low-pressure Pulse pressurisation technique was developed for measuring building airtightness at pressures that are considered more representative of that experienced by buildings under natural conditions. Due to the short and dynamic operation, this technique is able to minimize wind and buoyancy effects during the measurement of building pressure. The investigation, based on the “quasi-steady” temporal inertia model, explores a technique that generates a pressure pulse inside a building by releasing a known amount of air pulse over 1.5 s using a compressed air tank. The volumetric flow rate of the air pulse released from the tank is obtained by measuring the transient pressure in the air tank during a test run. The air leakage through the building envelope is then obtained by accounting for the compressibility of indoor air. Simultaneously, the pressure variation within the envelope of test building is monitored. Therefore, the leakage-pressure relationship of the building envelope can be obtained. The validity of the theoretical model and the assumptions on which the model is based are validated using experimental and numerical investigations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number107459
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume188
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Building airtightness
  • Experimental and numerical validations
  • Steady pressurisation method
  • The pulse technique
  • Unsteady approach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Building and Construction

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