Indication of strongly correlated electron transport and mott insulator in disordered multilayer ferritin structures (Dmfs)

Christopher Rourk, Yunbo Huang, Minjing Chen, Cai Shen

Research output: Journal PublicationArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electron tunneling in ferritin and between ferritin cores (a transition metal (iron) oxide storage protein) in disordered arrays has been extensively documented, but the electrical behavior of those structures in circuits with more than two electrodes has not been studied. Tests of devices using a layer-by-layer deposition process for forming multilayer arrays of ferritin that have been previously reported indicate that strongly correlated electron transport is occurring, consistent with models of electron transport in quantum dots. Strongly correlated electrons–electrons that engage in strong electron-electron interactions have been observed in transition metal oxides and quantum dots and can create unusual material behavior that is difficult to model, such as switching between a low resistance metal state and a high resistance Mott insulator state. This paper reports the results of the effect of various degrees of structural homogeneity on the electrical characteristics of these ferritin arrays. These results demonstrate for the first time that these structures can provide a switching function associated with the circuit that they are contained within, consistent with the observed behavior of strongly correlated electrons and Mott insulators.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4527
JournalMaterials
Volume14
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Conductive atomic force microscopy
  • Ferritin
  • Layer-by-layer deposition
  • Quantum dots
  • Strong correlations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science (all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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