Fundamental statistics of relatively permanent pigmented or vascular skin marks for criminal and victim identification

Arfika Nurhudatiana, Adams Wai Kin Kong, Keyan Matinpour, Siu Yeung Cho, Noah Craft

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent technological advances have allowed for a proliferation of digital images that may be involved in crimes. Using these images as evidence in legal cases like child pornography and masked gunmen can be challenging because usually the faces of the suspects are not visible. To perform personal identification in these images, we propose a biometric trait composed of a group of skin marks including, but not limited to, nevi, lentigines, cherry hemangiomas, and seborrheic keratoses. Due to their biological characteristics, we have grouped these as Relatively Permanent Pigmented or Vascular Skin Marks, abbreviated as RPPVSM. As statistical study of RPPVSM is essential before investigating their discriminative power, we present in this paper the fundamental statistics of RPPVSM. Back torso images were collected from 144 Caucasian, Asian, and Latino males, and a researcher trained in dermatology manually identified their RPPVSMs. The statistical results show that Caucasians tend to have more RPPVSMs than Asians and Latinos, and over 80 percent of middle to low density RPPVSM patterns are independently and uniformly distributed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2011 International Joint Conference on Biometrics, IJCB 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event2011 International Joint Conference on Biometrics, IJCB 2011 - Washington, DC, United States
Duration: 11 Oct 201113 Oct 2011

Publication series

Name2011 International Joint Conference on Biometrics, IJCB 2011

Conference

Conference2011 International Joint Conference on Biometrics, IJCB 2011
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityWashington, DC
Period11/10/1113/10/11

Keywords

  • forensics
  • personal identification
  • skin marks
  • spatial point pattern distribution
  • statistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology

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