Education and agricultural productivity: Evidence from Uganda

Simon Appleton, Arsene Balihuta

Research output: Journal PublicationArticlepeer-review

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Existing evidence on the impact of education on agricultural productivity in Africa is mixed, with estimates usually insignificant although sometimes large. Analysis of the first nationally representative household survey of Uganda gives an estimate of the impact of household primary schooling on crop production comparable to the developing country average. In addition, the primary schooling of neighbouring farm workers appears to raise crop production and these external returns exceed the internal returns. Education complements capital and substitutes for labour. Further productivity increases arise through education increasing physical capital and purchased inputs, but effects via crop choice appear negligible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-444
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of International Development
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Education and agricultural productivity: Evidence from Uganda'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this