Does process matter more for predicting trust in government? Participation, performance, and process, in local government in Japan

Shaun Goldfinch, Kiyoshi Yamamoto, Saizo Aoyagi

Research output: Journal PublicationArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trust in government and its antecedents and development remain leading policy and research concerns. Drawing on a broadly representative online survey of 3100 respondents in Japan, we examine measures of trust in three local government actors. We find political participation is not associated with trust in local government, contrary to our expectations. Civic participation is associated with trust in the mayor, but not councillors or administrators. Satisfaction with services provided by local government, and positive perceptions of policy process, are associated with trust, with interactions suggesting process is the stronger antecedent. To develop greater trust in local government, it is important that public sector actors exhibit respect for rights and follow procedure, laws, and regulations, as well as deliver positive outcomes. Building trust in government remains a key concern for policy makers, as it is related to successful adoption of policies. Trust in local government in Japan is related to perceived performance and citizen satisfaction. Civic participation is also related to some forms of trust in government. However, possibly more important are citizen perceptions that policy processes respect rights, procedures, and laws. To increase trust in government, practitioners need to practice, and show that they practice, good processes in developing and delivering policy, and show that policy leads to better perceived outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)842-863
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Review of Administrative Sciences
Volume89
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • citizen participation
  • civic participation
  • Due process
  • local government
  • performance
  • policy process
  • political participation
  • social capital
  • trust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

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