Cross-cultural differences in perceived effectiveness of influence tactics for initiating or resisting change

Gary Yukl, Ping Ping Fu, Robert McDonald

Research output: Journal PublicationReview articlepeer-review

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two exploratory studies were conducted to investigate cross-cultural differences in the perceived effectiveness of various influence tactics for gaining approval from a boss for a proposed change, or for resisting a change initiated by a boss. The first study compared managers in the United States, Switzerland, and mainland China. The second study compared managers in the United States, Hong Kong, and mainland China. Most results (91%) for the American and Chinese managers in Study 1 were replicated in Study 2. The cross-cultural differences in rated effectiveness of tactics were consistent with cultural values and traditions. Direct, task-oriented tactics were rated more effective by western managers than by Chinese managers, whereas tactics involving personal relations, avoidance, or an informal approach were rated less effective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-82
Number of pages15
JournalApplied Psychology
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology

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