Could the energy cost of using supercritical fluids be mitigated by using CO2 from carbon capture and storage (CCS)?

James G. Stevens, Pilar Gómez, Richard A. Bourne, Trevor C. Drage, Michael W. George, Martyn Poliakoff

Research output: Journal PublicationArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores the possibility of utilising supercritical CO2 obtained from carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a solvent and examines the hydrogenation of isophorone to 3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexanone using supercritical CO2 with added N2, CO or H2O to emulate the contaminants expected in CO2 from CCS. None of the impurities appear to cause insuperable problems in the hydrogenation of isophorone when present at concentrations likely to be found in CO2 from CCS. N2 introduces modest changes in phase behaviour at some pressures, while CO and H2O reduce the activity of the catalyst. However, the activity can be largely regained by increasing the reaction temperature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2727-2733
Number of pages7
JournalGreen Chemistry
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution

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