Bone marrow transplantation in AML, and socioeconomic class: A UK population-based cohort study

Fatima Bhayat, Emma Das-Gupta, Richard Hubbard

Research output: Journal PublicationArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We have previously shown that in the UK mortality in people with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) was nearly 50% greater among the most socio-economically deprived. The aim of this study was to determine whether AML patients from lower socioeconomic classes had a lower chance of receiving a bone marrow transplant.Methods: Using Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data, we identified all incident cases of AML admitted to UK hospitals between 1998 and 2007. We calculated the number of bone marrow transplantations undertaken in AML patients, stratifying our results by gender, age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, degree of socioeconomic deprivation and co-morbidity. We used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios for bone marrow transplantation, adjusting for gender, age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, degree of socioeconomic deprivation and co-morbidity score.Results: We identified a total of 23 910 incident cases of AML over this 10-year time period, of whom 1 140 (4.8%) underwent BMT. Bone marrow transplantation declined with increasing socioeconomic deprivation (p for trend < 0.001) such that people in the most deprived socioeconomic quintile were 40% less likely to have a transplant than those in the most advantaged group (Odds Ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.49, 0.73), even after adjusting for gender, age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis and co-morbidity.Conclusion: This large cohort study demonstrates that AML patients from lower socioeconomic classes are less likely to undergo bone marrow transplantation than their better off counter-parts.

Original languageEnglish
Article number514
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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